New songs and music worksheets pages

Halfway through my big reorganisation of TEFLtastic, found that I had, for some strange reason, combined music and song worksheets on one page. Have therefore split it into two updated and expanded pages, one on music (describing and discussing music, including linking to topics like giving opinions, making recommendations, articles/ determiners and IELTS), and another with my actual song worksheets (for second conditional, collocations, prepositions, tense review, adjectives, word order, narrative tenses, etc).

Music page (new page)

Songs page (repurposed, renamed and expanded)

There are also links to songs for particular language points on many of my pages for specific topics such as Present Continuous and possessives. New list here:

Pages with suggestions for songs for specific language points for EFL learners

Action word songs

Adjectives songs

Animal vocabulary songs

Articles songs

Body vocabulary songs

Can/ Can’t songs

Clothes vocabulary songs

Colour vocabulary songs

Comparative adjectives songs

Comparative and superlative songs

Conditionals songs

Dates songs

Days of the week songs

Determiners songs

ed and ing adjectives songs

Family vocabulary songs

Feelings songs

First conditional songs

Food vocabulary songs

Imperative songs

Likes and dislikes songs

Modals songs

Months songs

Numbers songs

Opposites songs

Ordinal songs

Past continuous songs

Past Simple songs

Past tenses songs

Phonics songs

Plurals songs

Possessive adjectives songs

Possessive S songs

Possessives songs

Prepositions songs

Prepositions of movement songs

Prepositions of position songs

Prepositions of time songs

Present Continuous for future arrangements songs

Present Continuous songs

Present Perfect Continuous songs

Present Perfect songs

Present Simple and Continuous songs

Present Simple songs

Requests songs

Second conditional songs

Shapes songs

Short answers songs

Superlative songs

Telling the time songs

Tense review songs

There is/ There are songs

Third person S songs

Time expressions songs

Toys vocabulary songs

Transport vocabulary songs

Used to songs

Want/ Want to songs

Weather vocabulary songs

Will songs

Yes/ No questions songs

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TEFLtastic index page now easier to use

While using my worksheet pages A to Z list myself, noticed that for some reason I’d rather inconveniently added “See… above/ below” like a book index when I first made it. Now added proper hyperlinks to all those instead, so that for example it now goes

EAP games/ worksheets – See Academic English (EAP) games/ worksheets

This should mean you can now quickly scan down and click to find worksheets on almost anything. Have also changed the name to the hopefully more memorable and so more easily Googleable:

TEFLtastic games/ worksheets pages A to Z

You can also of course just Google the page you’re looking for with “games/ worksheets” and/ or “TEFLtastic”, or use the drop-down menus under the picture above.

Now that is done, I’ve now started polishing up all those (approx. 350!) worksheet pages. See here for how to help me help you.

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Good and bad responses (TEFLtastic Classics Part 37)

The first in a few additions to my occasional series on the most adaptable games/ activities in TEFL, revived due to finding that there are some real TEFL classics that are in my new e-book and I use all the time but had never got round to mentioning.

This activity was inspired by TOEIC (not an expression that you’ll hear very often!), specifically the part of the listening where students try to spot the one correct response to the thing that the first speaker said. The actual exam exercise has some typical TOEIC problems like being more a vocab test than actual listening practice. However, the idea is a great way of moving from learning useful functional language phrases to starting to put them into dialogues, as well as dealing with common mistakes such as “How do you do?” “I’m fine, thank you”.

Possible adaptations include:

  • having as many responses as are useful for each question (rather than always three)
  • doing the whole thing for just one language point (e.g. telephoning)
  • teaching more language by having two or more good responses, and getting students to spot the one bad responses
  • moving onto students testing each other in the same way, seeing if they respond with no help, and then building dialogues starting with one of the phrases

Here are some I prepared earlier:

Good and bad travel English responses

Good and bad negotiating responses

Good and bad telephoning responses

Good and bad responses in restaurants (in this e-book) – NEW

Good and bad small talk responses (in this e-book) – NEW

Also useful:

  • good and bad responses to requests
  • good and bad responses in presentation Q&A sessions
  • good and bad responses in meetings
  • good and bad responses in teleconferences and video conferences
  • arrangements good and bad responses
  • good and bad responses for security guards

All of which I have tried and will be in e-books on the topics sometime soonish. In the meantime, please check out the other TEFLtastic classic posts, well worth a look even if you have before, as I continually update them with links to new photocopiable versions.

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35 reasons to buy Teaching Social English

Reasons why you should shell out a couple of quid on my new e-book

  1. You want to start term with something which is fun and light but also useful outside the classroom
  2. Your students are going to meet you and each other (for the first time or again) in the next class and you want them to do so in a way which matches how they should do so outside the classroom
  3. You will start and/ or end future classes with small talk and want to teach your students how to fully take part
  4. Your students find it easier to write technical reports and give presentations on their speciality than to start and end conversations, chat in the elevator, give advice to foreign visitors, explain local foods, etc
  5. Conversations when students meet each you and each other (for the first time again) are slow, awkward, unlike real-life chats, etc
  6. Your students can’t respond well to your small talk questions
  7. Your students are not good at asking you and each other small talk questions
  8. Your students endlessly re-use “Nice to meet you”, “How are you?” and “I’m fine, thank you. And you?”
  9. Your students’ social skills in their own language don’t transfer well to English
  10. Your students lack social skills even in their own language
  11. Your students blunder into taboo topics
  12. Your students avoid or are shocked by perfectly okay topics
  13. Your students are not good at finishing small talk and conversations smoothly
  14. Your textbook/ syllabus doesn’t link the language well to real life conversations
  15. Your textbook mainly asks students for their opinions/ has heavy discussion questions
  16. You’re going to be teaching business skills and have found that Social English is the most popular topic
  17. You’re going to teach a whole course on Social English and need a whole stack of suitable materials
  18. You’re going to teach a whole course on Social English and need more interactive materials to add more real communication and practice to the materials you are using (from Delta, the Oxford Express series, etc)
  19. You want to add a class or two on Social English to a textbook course, business skills course, etc
  20. You want to tie the language you are studying (present tenses, jobs vocab, past tenses, prepositions, determiners, question formation, auxiliary verbs, tense reviews, TOEIC listening, etc) to more real-life questions
  21. You want an easy introduction for you and/ or your students to some games that can easily be adapted to other language points (board games, card games, coin games, dice games, jigsaw activities, lying games, memory games, TPR activities, etc)
  22. You’ve used some of the TEFLtastic classics and wish there were versions for meeting people, small talk, recommendations, invitations or socialising
  23. You’ve used some of my worksheets and wish there were polished up versions with the typos fixed, easier to cut up cards, etc
  24. You’re feeling grateful for all the free teaching ideas and materials I’ve supplied you with
  25. You’re feeling guilty for all of my teaching ideas and materials that you’ve used for free
  26. You are the third person to have an ideological objection to me providing stuff for no pay
  27. You’re feeling guilty for all the teaching ideas and materials you’ve borrowed off other teachers and want to add something to the teachers’ room that everyone can use
  28. You have realised you don’t need an expensive subscription to Onestopenglish etc and are looking for a lower cost option
  29. You want me to turn down a few cover classes and polish up TEFLtastic instead
  30. You want me to turn down a few cover classes and write some more books in the series (on IELTS, presentations, meetings, negotiations, emailing, telephoning, etc) instead
  31. You want me to concentrate on writing books and not revert to writing stupid lists like this one
  32. You went to one of my conference presentations and want me to concentrate on writing instead of inflicting that on more people
  33. You bought a copy of my last book when it came out and are ready to shell out again
  34. You know you’ll just waste the money and trust me to spend it better
  35. You were the person who borrowed my copy of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas at Koparan Summer Camp in 1996 and are still feeling guilty about never giving it back
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New TEFL stuff summer 2019

Most generally useful top and most specialist bottom of each section:

 

New TEFL e-book summer 2019

Teaching Social English: Interactive Classroom Activities – NEW

 

New TEFL articles summer 2019

How to use body language and gestures in EFL classes

Teaching pronunciation through body language and gestures

How to teach international body language and gestures

A guide to rude, offensive, insulting and taboo gestures for EFL learners

CPE Use of English Part One tips – NEW

Aptis Speaking Part One preparation tips

 

New TEFL games/ worksheets summer 2019

Needs analysis and brainstorming

Needs analysis and Aptis Speaking Part One practice

Word formation list dictation game

Job applications line by line brainstorming

Make your own conditionals discussion questions

Jobs drawing game

Present and past ability sentence completion games (guessing, things in common, and bluffing) 

Please plus verb for offers and commands in emails

First letter phonics miming game

CPE Speaking Part Three on the future

CPE- Speaking Part One on the future

Business communication prepositions and determiners pairwork speaking game

Nationality words syllables maze games

Business communication pairwork correction game

Gradable and extreme adjectives speaking card games

Expanding Aptis Speaking Part One answers activities

Aptis Speaking Part One functional language games

Negotiating insurance roleplays 

Insurance trends speaking

 

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The first TEFLtastic book for teachers

Teaching Social English: Interactive Classroom Activities

(Rushed out now as it’s especially useful for new courses)

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New Aptis tips and materials page

Not sure how many students and teachers are interested in actually preparing for Aptis, but as I seem to be the only person to have published games and photocopiable worksheets on the topic, am hoping for a large market share of an incredibly niche market. Lots more coming soon, but the first article, three PDFs and links to other people’s stuff up here:

Aptis games, worksheets and tips

For the many people who’ve never even heard of Aptis, might I suggest the rest of my EFL exams materials section, probably the biggest of all the parts of this site?

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120 using movement to teach and learn English links

The ridiculously large number above includes all the links here, in other pages it links to, and in my previous post on actions for teaching and learning grammar.

Body language and gestures in TEFL articles

Body language and gestures in TEFL articles page – NEW

 

Body language and gestures in TEFL lists

Body language and gestures lists – NEW

 

Body language and gestures in TEFL photocopiables

Cultural differences/ Cultural training TPR worksheets

Xmas TPR worksheets

Xmas and New Year past tenses mimes

Going to and will Xmas mimes

Xmas and New Year tense review mimes

Xmas Present Simple Present Continuous mimes

 

Worksheets for teaching gestures (rather than language through gestures)

Food cultural differences mimes

Table manners Present Simple and Continuous mimes

Guess the meaning of the British body language and gestures 

International gestures Present Simple and Continuous

Gestures cultural differences game (miming and then talking about use and not of those gestures)

Universal gestures functional language review

International gestures for business and academic presentations and much improved Version 2

Job applications Body language and personality

Body language gestures identify the country

Body language differences pairwork

Gestures that vary by country miming

Job applications personality and body language

and see the articles page for an article on this.

 

TPR worksheets for presentation skills training

Presentations voice and body roleplays

Gestures for presentations and related useful phrases

Body language and gestures for presentations (simpler version of the one above)

 

TPR worksheets for travel English

Present Continuous travel mimes

Going to Travel mimes and useful phrases

Travel English Past Continuous mimes

Countable and uncountable going to travel mimes

 

TPR worksheets for functional language

Universal gestures functional language review

Directions miming game

Shopping language mimes

Likes and dislikes TPR coin game

Telephoning hold on mimes

Phrases for negotiations mimes, brainstorming and key words

Discussion skills phrases miming game

Everyday English social expressions mimes

Gestures and social language review

 

TPR worksheets for vocabulary

Food and drink vocabulary TPR worksheets

Food and drink mimes

Food and drink actions Present Continuous mimes

Cooking and eating verb mimes

 

Technical English/ English for engineers TPR worksheets

Technical English mimes

British and American engineering vocabulary games (including miming, drawing, jigsaw, reversi, and dominoes, plus collocations practice)

 

Business English TPR worksheets

Present Continuous and Present Simple job mimes

Business English Present Continuous mimes

Language of trends miming game (great for Business and IELTS classes)

Job applications personality and body language

 

Other ESP TPR worksheets

Medical English Present Continuous mimes

 

Idioms TPR worksheets

Phrasal verb mimes

Body idioms mimes pairwork

 

Other TPR vocabulary worksheets

Present Continuous vocabulary revision mimes (for New Cutting Edge Intermediate, but you could easily adapt the idea for your own classes)

Opposites miming game

Feelings drawing and miming games

Classroom objects Simon Says TPR game

Appearance opposites games (including drawing games, miming games, reversi and, coin game and roleplays)

Personality opposites miming games

Adjectives for describing objects games (reversi, jigsaw, drawing and miming)

Hobbies Present Continuous mimes

Can can’t sports mimes

Gradable and extreme adjectives miming game

 

TPR pronunciation worksheets

First letter phonics miming game – NEW

 

TPR worksheets for teacher training

Body language and phrases for managing classes

Classroom language mimes game

and see the list page for gestures for teachers

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Learning grammar through body language and gestures links

Some people may have noticed from my last list of new stuff that “my boom” (as we say in Janglish) is writing about moving around and getting students to move around in class. In fact, it’s so much of an obsession that there is too much to put in one post, so I thought I’d start with what is for some reason by far the most popular topic on TEFLtastic: grammar:

 

Grammar through body language and gestures in TEFL articles

Using body language and gestures to teach grammar

52 TPR grammar games

Physical games to practice a/ an

TPR activities for prepositions of position

TPR games for can/ can’t for ability

 

TPR grammar worksheets

TPR grammar worksheets for teaching tenses

TPR worksheets for present tenses

Gestures cultural differences game (miming and then talking about use and not of those gestures)

Food and drink mimes

Food cultural differences mimes

Table manners Present Simple and Continuous mimes

Xmas Present Simple and Continuous mimes

Present Continuous and Present Simple job mimes

Are they … or… TPR game

Present Continuous travel mimes

Hobbies Present Continuous mimes

Medical English Present Continuous mimes

Technical English mimes

Business English Present Continuous mimes

Telephoning hold on mimes

Present Continuous vocabulary revision mimes (for New Cutting Edge Intermediate, but you could easily adapt the idea for your own classes)

Business English Present Continuous sounds and mimes

 

TPR worksheets for past tenses

Bad habits Past Continuous

Travel English Past Continuous mimes

Cutting Edge Intermediate Modules 1 and 2 Past Continuous mimes

Xmas and New Year past tenses mimes

 

TPR worksheets for future forms

Going to mimes

Going to Travel mimes and useful phrases

Countable and uncountable going to travel mimes

Going to and will Xmas mimes

 

TPR worksheets for other tenses

Present Perfect Simple and Continuous mimes

Xmas and New Year tense review mimes

 

Prepositions of position TPR worksheets

Prepositions of position miming games

Prepositions of position making sentences TPR game

and see above for an article on the topic.

 

Imperative TPR worksheets

Imperative pick and act TPR game

Good behaviour mimes (imperative)

 

Can and can’t TPR worksheets

Can can’t sports mimes

Can and can’t miming coin game

and see above for an article on the topic.

 

Comparative and superlative TPR worksheets

Comparative adjectives miming games

Comparative and superlative miming games

 

Other TPR grammar worksheets

Singular and plural possessives TPR game

Singular and plural mimes

Gradable and extreme adjectives miming game

This that these those mimes

Phrasal verb mimes

and see above for an article on “a” and “and”

 

Similar on vocabulary, pronunciation, etc coming up in the next post.

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Line by line brainstorming (TEFLtastic classics Part 37)

9 September 2019

As with most of these nearly 40 so-called “TEFLtastic classics”, this post is to introduce some variations on a long-standing favourite that I reckon make it even more of a classic.

I originally came across the idea of brainstorming line by line in various Headway textbooks, in a version where students listen to a line of dialogue, guess what’s coming next, listen to check, guess what comes after that, etc. Not having a recording studio, I created a version where students cover the page and reveal each line when they’ve guessed what is coming next. Luckily, this also means that students can work in pairs at their own pace. The worksheet can also then be used for other activities like being cut up and used for jigsaw tasks and/ or being partially covered again for students to read and then continue in their own way, as a kind of semi-controlled speaking activity.

Over several years of using this for various purposes, I realised that the activity was not as motivating as it is fun, as students could rarely actually guess the next line – unsurprisingly, given what real communication is like! I have therefore more recently added a line between each line of the dialogue where the next line is described with sentences like “The receiver asks the caller to wait” or “The interviewee answers the question, but also says something positive”. After trying to guess the next line of dialogue, students look at this hint to see if they are on the right track, brainstorm again if they weren’t close, and then reveal the next line of dialogue. In another unintended advantage, a blanked out version of the same worksheet can then be used for students to write down the phrases they can remember or think of for each function.

Here are a few I made earlier:

Line by line brainstorming photocopiables

Invitations line by line brainstorming (in this e-book) – NEW

Meeting people again line by line brainstorming (in this e-book) – NEW

Meeting people at conferences line by line brainstorming (in this e-book) – NEW

Meeting people at the airport line by line brainstorming (in this e-book) – NEW

Visiting a client and meeting visitors line by line brainstorming (in this e-book) – NEW

Job applications line by line brainstorming

Meeting people line by line brainstorming

Requests and enquiries line by line brainstorming

Telephoning line by line brainstorming

There will be polished up versions of these and many more in the various e-books I’m putting together on teaching telephoning, meetings, presentations, negotiations, social English, emailing, etc. If you’d like to help me find enough time to finish them, please buy a(nother) copy or two of my first e-book. Thanks!

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