If You Give a Mouse a Cookie First Conditional stories

Before or after reading, listening to or watching the video of the story “If You Give a Mouse a Cookie”, match up the sentence halves below.

 

l  If he asks for a glass of milk,

l  If you give a mouse a cookie,

l  Looking at the refrigerator will remind him that he’s thirsty so

l  When he looks at the pictures,

l  When he looks into the mirror,

l  When he’s done,

l  When he’s finished giving himself a trim,

l  When he’s finished,

l  When the picture is finished,

l  When you give him the milk,

 

²  he might notice that his hair needs a trim. So he’ll probably ask for a pair of nail scissors.

²  he’ll ask for a glass of milk.

²  he’ll ask you for a napkin. Then he’ll want to look into the mirror.

²  he’ll hang up his drawing on the refrigerator and stand back to look at it.

²  he’ll probably ask you for a straw.

²  he’ll probably want to take a nap. So you’ll read him from one of your books and he’ll ask to see the pictures.

²  he’ll want a broom to sweep up.

²  he’ll want to draw one of his own and he’ll ask for paper and crayons.

²  he’s going to ask for a glass of milk.

²  he’s going to want a cookie to go with it.

 

Put the completed phrases above into order to make a story.

Read, listen to or watch the YouTube video of the book and check. Some of the sentences in the book are not above, but you should still be able to match the phrases above and put them into order.  

What are the differences in meaning between these pairs?

If you give him some milk,…

When you give home the milk,…

 

… he’ll notice that his hair needs a trim.

… he might notice that his hair needs a trim.

 

… he’ll ask you for a straw.

… he’ll probably ask you for a straw.

 

Make up similar stories like “If you give an elephant a hat” and “If you give a spider a comic”.

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PDF version for easy saving and printing: if-you-give-a-mouse-a-cookie-first-conditional