Explaining Japanese food and drink

Explaining Japanese food and drink

Part One

Imagine your partner is a foreign guest who arrived in your country for the first time yesterday and has little experience eating your country’s food. Choose places from below that you think might be suitable for a foreign guest. Suggest going there to them, then explain what each place and its food is like. Do they like your ideas?

Akachochin bar

Champon restaurant

Chankonabe restaurant

Conveyor belt sushi bar

Donburi restaurant/ Gyudon restaurant

Family restaurant

Fugu restaurant

Geisha bar

Genghis Khan restaurant

Hanami party

High ball bar

Izakaya

Karaoke box

Kushiyaki restaurant

Monjayaki restaurant

Motsuyaki restaurant

Nomihoudai

Oden restaurant

Okinawan bar/ restaurant

Okonomiyaki restaurant

Ryotei

Sake bar

Shabu-shabu restaurant

Shochu bar

“Snack”/ Mama-san bar

Soba restaurant

Tachinomiya bar

Teishokuya

Tempura restaurant

Tonkatsu restaurant

Tonkotsu ramen restaurant

Wagashiya

Yakatabune

Yakiniku restaurant

Yakitori restaurant

Yatai

Youshoku restaurant

 

Are any of the places above unsuitable for entertaining foreign guests? Why?


Explaining Japanese food and drink Part Two

Roleplay a conversation with the same foreign guest who is in your country for the first time, this time imagining you are already inside a Japanese-style restaurant or bar and this is its menu. Make recommendations for what your partner should try, explaining what all the things are. Only use words that a foreign person who has only eaten a little Japanese food in their own country would understand (meaning words like “sushi” are fine).

Agedashi dofu

Basashi

Champon

Chawan mushi

Chikuwa

Chirashizushi/ Maki-zushi

Daikon salad

Edamame

Genmai

Gobo kinpira

Goya champuru

Gunkan sushi

Gyoza

Hayashi rice

Hijiki salad

Ikura

Kamaboko

Kappamaki

Karaage

Kareraisu

Konnyaku

Maguro and negi sushi

Mentaiko

Mochi

Motsuyaki

Natto

Nikujaga

Nikuman

Nori

Ochazuke

O-kayu

Omuraisu

Onigiri

O-sechi- ryori

Oyakodon

Reimen

Sashimi

Sekihan

Shabu-shabu

Shumai

Somen

Sukiyaki

Sunomono

Tamagoyaki

Tekkamaki

Temaki-zushi

Tofu

Tonjiru

Tonkatsu

Tsukemono

Udon

Umeboshi

Unagi-don

Yaki-imo

Yakiniku

Yakisoba

Yakitori

Zaru soba

Sauces and condiments

Mirin

Ponzu

Shichimi

Wasabi

Desserts

Anmitsu

Daigaku imo

Daifuku

Dango

Dorayaki

Kakigori

Karinto

Manju

Taiyaki

Drinks

Chuhai

Genmai cha

Happoshu

Hoppy

Houjicha

Matcha

Mugicha

Shochu

Umeshu


Explaining Japanese food and drink Part Three

What Japanese food matches each of the following descriptions? Try to write the names next to the descriptions without looking above first of all.

Japanese-style curry.

Japanese-style fried chicken.

Various parts of chicken and vegetables threaded on bamboo skewers and grilled over charcoal. Before cooking, it is flavoured with salt or a mild sweet soy sauce.

A fairly sweet plum liqueur.

A giant savoury pancake cooked right in front of you on a hot plate. You choose the ingredients and make it yourself.

A rice ball with fillings, sometimes wrapped in dried seaweed.

A slightly hot mixture of seven spices.

A slightly sweet Japanese omelette, usually made in thin layers and then folded together.

Barley tea, usually served cold.

Brown rice.

Chewy rice cake, made from short-grained sticky rice.

Chinese steamed pork buns.

Crispy sheets of thin seaweed.

Cucumber sushi, wrapped in dried seaweed.

Fermented soy beans, often eaten at breakfast but very much an acquired taste due to their strong smell, aftertaste and sliminess.

Fresh green soya beans, often served as a healthy snack or appetiser.

Fried breaded pork cutlets served with a spicy brown sauce.

Grilled tripe (kidneys, liver, guts, etc).

Japanese horseradish, with a green colour and very pungent taste which goes up your nose, something like English mustard.

Japanese mushrooms, often dried.

Japanese pickles, usually fairly lightly salted.

Japanese rice wine.

Japanese spirits made from ingredients such as rice, Japanese potatoes and sweet potatoes. Not usually as strong as Western spirits such as vodka. Drinkable straight, on the rocks, diluted with water, or with mixers such as oolong tea.

Large fish eggs, often served as part of sushi or on rice.

Like a kind of stew or non-spicy curry with a sauce that tastes like gravy, served on rice.

“Potstickers” – a kind of Chinese dumpling that are fried on one side, filled with minced meat and garlic.

Powdered green tea, with a somewhat or very bitter taste. Drunk as part of the Japanese tea ceremony, but nowadays more common as a flavour in other things such as ice cream.

Processed fish cake, often included in the broth of noodles.

Raw horse meat.

Rice porridge.

Seafood and vegetables are deep-fried in a crispy, light batter.

Shaved ice with sweet toppings such as strawberry syrup and condensed milk.

Slices of raw fish.

Small spicy fish eggs.

A cheap, low malt alternative to beer.

Sour pickled dried plums.

Sweet Japanese rice dumplings, often covered with a caramelly sauce.

Sweet rice wine vinegar, used as a flavouring in things such as sushi rice.

A kind of savoury custard, usually served as a side dish.

Thick white wheat noodles.

Thin, greyish noodles made of buckwheat and wheat flour. Sometimes eaten plain and cold dipped in a sauce.

Thinly sliced beef and a variety of vegetables are dipped into a bubbling broth and quickly cooked. A selection of special dipping sauces are used.

A big white radish, something like a long suede, which is often grated and eaten raw.

Bean curd.

Look at the worksheets above to help with this task, then check your answers as a class.

 

Find words and expressions in the descriptions above that have the meanings below. If you get stuck, try to think about which food might be described that way, then find words in that description that match these definitions.

a piece of hot flat metal that you cook on top of

a small course or snack served right at the very beginning of the meal, sometimes while still looking at the menu

an extra dish served with the main course, usually on a separate smaller plate or bowl

cooked floating in a lot of oil

hard and thin, so it breaks and crunches when you bite it

not sweet

plants from the sea

put around the outside of something

put one food briefly into another food or sauce

soft drinks such as soda water when put with alcoholic drinks to make them weaker and/ or add taste

something that most people don’t like the first time that they try it (although people who have got used to it may love it)

strong but sweet alcohol

the insides of an animal

the main ingredient of beer, similar to wheat

the opposite of strong

thin sharp pieces of wood or metal, put through food in order to cook it

things inside

things put on a dish to give it more flavour and/ or colour.

things that make up a recipe

uncooked

very strong taste or smell

water and flour plus maybe egg that things are coated in before frying

water flavoured by meat and/ or vegetables for cooking in

with no sauce


Hints

The words to match the task above are in bold below

Japanese-style curry.

Japanese-style fried chicken.

Various parts of chicken and vegetables threaded on bamboo skewers and grilled over charcoal. Before cooking, it is flavoured with salt or a mild sweet soy sauce.

A fairly sweet plum liqueur.

A giant savoury pancake cooked right in front of you on a hot plate. You choose the ingredients and make it yourself.

A rice ball with fillings, sometimes wrapped in dried seaweed.

A slightly hot mixture of seven spices.

A slightly sweet Japanese omelette, usually made in thin layers and then folded together.

Barley tea, usually served cold.

Brown rice.

Chewy rice cake, made from short-grained sticky rice.

Chinese steamed pork buns.

Crispy sheets of thin seaweed.

Cucumber sushi, wrapped in dried seaweed.

Fermented soy beans, often eaten at breakfast but very much an acquired taste due to their strong smell, aftertaste and sliminess.

Fresh green soya beans, often served as a healthy snack or appetiser.

Fried breaded pork cutlets served with a spicy brown sauce.

Grilled tripe (kidneys, liver, guts, etc).

Japanese horseradish, with a green colour and very pungent taste which goes up your nose, something like English mustard.

Japanese mushrooms, often dried.

Japanese pickles, usually fairly lightly salted.

Japanese rice wine.

Japanese spirits made from ingredients such as rice, Japanese potatoes and sweet potatoes. Not usually as strong as Western spirits such as vodka. Drinkable straight, on the rocks, diluted with water, or with mixers such as oolong tea.

Large fish eggs, often served as part of sushi or on rice.

Like a kind of stew or non-spicy curry with a sauce that tastes like gravy, served on rice.

“Potstickers” – a kind of Chinese dumpling that are fried on one side, filled with minced meat and garlic.

Powdered green tea, with a somewhat or very bitter taste. Drunk as part of the Japanese tea ceremony, but nowadays more common as a flavour in other things such as ice cream.

Processed fish cake, often included in the broth of noodles.

Raw horse meat.

Rice porridge.

Seafood and vegetables are deep-fried in a crispy, light batter.

Shaved ice with sweet toppings such as strawberry syrup and condensed milk.

Slices of raw fish.

Small spicy fish eggs.

A cheap, low malt alternative to beer.

Sour pickled dried plums.

Sweet Japanese rice dumplings, often covered with a caramelly sauce.

Sweet rice wine vinegar, used as a flavouring in things such as sushi rice.

A kind of savoury custard, usually served as a side dish.

Thick white wheat noodles.

Thin, greyish noodles made of buckwheat and wheat flour. Sometimes eaten plain and cold dipped in a sauce.

Thinly sliced beef and a variety of vegetables are dipped into a bubbling broth and quickly cooked. A selection of special dipping sauces are used.

A big white radish, something like a long suede, which is often grated and eaten raw.

Bean curd.

 

Suggested answers

a piece of hot flat metal that you cook on top of – hot plate

a small course or snack served right at the very beginning of the meal, sometimes while still looking at the menu – appetiser

an extra dish served with the main course, usually on a separate smaller plate or bowl – side dish

cooked floating in a lot of oil – deep fried

hard and thin, so it breaks and crunches when you bite it – crisp

not sweet – savoury

plants from the sea – seaweed

put around the outside of something – wrap

put one food briefly into another food or sauce – dip

soft drinks such as soda water when put with alcoholic drinks to make them weaker and/ or add taste – mixer

something that most people don’t like the first time that they try it (although people who have got used to it may love it) – an acquired taste

strong but sweet alcohol – liqueur

the insides of an animal – tripe

the main ingredient of beer, similar to wheat – barley

the opposite of strong – mild

thin sharp pieces of wood or metal, put through food in order to cook it – skewer

things inside – fillings

things put on a dish to give it more flavour and/ or colour – toppings

things that make up a recipe – ingredients

uncooked – raw

very strong taste or smell – pungent

water and flour plus maybe egg that things are coated in before frying – batter

water flavoured by meat and/ or vegetables for cooking in – broth

with no sauce – plain

——————–

 PDF version for easy saving and printing: explaining-japanese-food-and-drink-updated-15-december-2016

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