Relative clauses Slang Call My Bluff

Student A

Make up definitions for the slang expressions followed by blanks below and write them down in the same format as the other sentences. If you already know the meaning of an expression which is blank below, please make up a wrong definition rather than writing the real one. When you have finished, read out your true and made up definitions to another student/ group, and see if they can guess which one is which

“Spend a penny”, which is a British expression, means “go to the toilet” (True sentence, just read it out as it is)

“Any road”, _________________________________, _______________________________________________ (False sentence- make up a false definition before you read it out)

“Ankle biter”, ______________________________, _____________________________________________

“Ballpark figure”, which comes from American sport, means “approximate amount”

“Barmy”, which comes from British English, means “crazy”

“Brewski”, which is only use in America, means “a beer”

“Dead presidents”, ________________________________, _______________________________________

“Baccy”, which is British slang, is short for “tobacco”

“Belt up”, _________________________________, ____________________________________

Continue the game, but copying or making up definitions for slang you know or find in the photocopies your teacher gives you or off the internet

——————————————————-


Relative clauses British, American and Australian Slang Call My Bluff

Student B

Make up definitions for the slang expressions followed by blanks below and write them down in the same format as the other sentences. If you already know the meaning of an expression which is blank below, please make up a wrong definition rather than writing the real one. When you have finished, read out your true and made up definitions to another student/ group, and see if they can guess which one is which

“The bees’ knees”, ________________________________, _________________________________________________ (False sentence- make up a false definition before you read it out)

“Bent out of shape”, __________________________________, ________________________________

“Bite your arm off”, ____________________________, ____________________________________________

“Arvo”, which is a typical piece of Australian slang, is short for “afternoon” True sentence, just read it out as it is)

“Have a butchers”, __________________________________________, ____________________________________________

“A chin wag”, which comes from the UK, is another way to say “a chat”

“I am beat”, which is only used in the US, means “I am tired”

“Airhead”, which is an American insult, means “stupid”

Continue the game, but copying or making up definitions for slang you know or find in the photocopies your teacher gives you or off the internet

——————————————————————


Relative clauses British, American and Australian Slang Call My Bluff

Student A

“Spend a penny”, which is a British expression, means “go to the toilet”

“Any road”, which is a British expression, means “anyway”

“Ankle biter”, which is Aussie slang, means “small child”

“Ballpark figure”, which comes from American sport, means “approximate amount”

“Barmy”, which comes from British English, means “crazy”

“Brewski”, which is only use in America, means “a beer”

“Dead presidents”, which comes from the States, means “paper money”

“Baccy”, which is British slang, is short for “tobacco”

“Belt up”, which is used in the North of England, means “shut up”

——————————————————————————

Student B

“The bees’ knees”, which is something British people say, means “the best”

“Bent out of shape”, which comes from the US, means “annoyed”

“Bite your arm off”, which is British English, means “really keen to get something”

“Arvo”, which is a typical piece of Australian slang, is short for “afternoon”

“Have a butchers”, which is Cockney rhyming slang from London, means “have a look”

“A chin wag”, which comes from the UK, is another way to say “a chat”

“I am beat”, which is only used in the US, means “I am tired”

“Airhead”, which is an American insult, means “stupid”

————————————————————————–

Relative clauses British, American and Australian Slang Call My Bluff Version 2

Student A

The definitions below are true definitions of slang in English. The ones that are blank are ones you need to make up false definitions for. Read out a combination of the true ones and the ones you made up, and see if your partner can work out which one is which.

  • 1. “It’s gone walkabout”, _____________________________, __________________________________________
  • 2. “Veggies”, which is used in Britain and Australia, is short for “vegetables”
  • 3. “She’s no oil painting”, which is an old British expression, means “she isn’t very attractive”
  • 4. “Hair of the dog”, _________________________, ________________________________________
  • 5. “To veg out”, ____________________________________, _______________________________________________
  • 6. “Uni”, which is an expression used in all kinds of English speaking countries, is short for “university”

Continue with true or false definitions of other slang you know


Relative clauses British, American and Australian Slang Call My Bluff Version 2

Student B

The definitions below are true definitions of slang in English. The ones that are blank are ones you need to make up false definitions for. Read out a combination of the true ones and the ones you made up, and see if your partner can work out which one is which.

  • 1. “A tinny”, ____________________________, _____________________________________
  • 2. “Tucker”, which is traditional Australian slang, means “food”
  • 3. “To spit the dummy”, ___________________________, ______________________________________________
  • 4. “To swot”, which is only used in the UK and not understood by American, means “to study hard”
  • 5. “A quid”, which was a word first used in Britain and then spread to Australia, is “a pound”
  • 6. “A piece of cake”, _______________________________, ___________________________________________

Continue with true or false definitions of other slang you know

Relative clauses British, American and Australian Slang Call My Bluff Version 2

Answer Key

“It’s gone walkabout”, which is an Australian expression, means “I have lost it”

“Veggies”, which is used in Britain and Australia, is short for “vegetables”

“She’s no oil painting”, which is an old British expression, means “she isn’t very attractive”

“Hair of the dog” means “a little bit of alcohol to cure your hangover”

“To veg out”, which comes from Australia and is also used in Britain, means “to be a couch potato”

“Uni”, which is an expression used in all kinds of English speaking countries, is short for “university”

“A tinny”, which is slang that is only used in Australia, is “a can of beer”

“Tucker”, which is traditional Australian slang, means “food”

“To spit the dummy”, which is mainly used in Australia, means “to get very upset or lose your temper”

“To swot”, which is only used in the UK and not understood by American, means “to study hard”

“A quid”, which was a word first used in Britain and then spread to Australia, is “a pound”

“A piece of cake”, which is used all over, means something easy

——————————————————————-

PDF version for easy saving and printing: Relative clauses Br Am Aus slang Call My Bluff

Advertisements

One Response to Relative clauses Slang Call My Bluff

  1. This exercise is excellent! Thanks so much for sharing.

Leave a comment (link optional and email never shared)

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s