British and American business etiquette Modals

British and American business etiquette modals practice Updated September 2016

Fill each gap below with at least modal verb or similar form (“have to” etc). You can also add adverbs like “usually” and “probably” if you like.  

You _________________________ call a Welsh, Scottish or Northern Irish person “English”.

In America, you ____________________ emphasise your (many) achievements in a job interview. In the UK you ___________________ be modest about your achievements.

In America, you _______________________ say how proud you are of your children’s achievements, but in the UK you ___________________.

The British often make critical comments about their country. You ________________ join in by making other negative comments about the UK.

In the UK, you ________________________ say sorry to someone who has bumped into you (even if it isn’t your fault at all).

In the UK, you ______________________ pay each time you order a round of drinks for everyone and you ____________________ take turns being the person on in your group who pays.

You ________________________ smoke in a British pub.

In the UK, you ________________________ bring humour into every meeting, presentation and conference speech.

You ___________________ be exactly on time or a little early for a British business meeting, but you _____________________ arrive ten to twenty minutes late for a dinner party at someone’s house.

You ____________________ use first names with managers of your company in both America and the UK.

—————————

Suggested answers

Many other answers are possible, so please check with your teacher if you wrote something different.

You _____mustn’t_____________________ call a Welsh, Scottish or Northern Irish person “English”.

In America, you _____need to_______________ emphasise your (many) achievements in a job interview. In the UK you _______should____________ be modest about your achievements.

In America, you __________can_____________ say how proud you are of your children’s achievements, but in the UK you ______shouldn’t_____________.

The British often make critical comments about their country. You __mustn’t______________ join in by making other negative comments about the UK.

In the UK, you _______should_________________ say sorry to someone who has bumped into you (even if it isn’t your fault at all).

In the UK, you _____have to _________________ pay each time you order a round of drinks for everyone and you ________have to/ must____________ take turns being the person on in your group who pays.

You __________can’t_______________ smoke in a British pub.

In the UK, you _____can/ should___________________ bring humour into every meeting, presentation and conference speech.

You ________must____________ be exactly on time or a little early for a British business meeting, but you _________should____________ arrive ten to twenty minutes late for a dinner party at someone’s house.

You _________can (usually/ almost always) ___________ use first names with managers of your company in both America and the UK.

What things above are different in your country? Make similar sentences about those and other things. Does your partner think it is true and/ or think the same is true about their country?

What other differences do you know between Britain and the USA?


PDF version for easy saving and printing: british-and-american-business-etiquette-modals

5 Responses to British and American business etiquette Modals

  1. Zerfico lucas cumbe says:

    interesting exercises i will enjoy working on them definitely they will be helpful

  2. Meetke says:

    Hello,
    Could you give the keys?
    Thank you.

  3. alexcase says:

    No time to make one at the moment, but if you let me know which ones you can’t guess the answer to, will write the answers here.

  4. lauren ferrington says:

    Please do give the keys!!

  5. alexcase says:

    Improved version with key just done and posted. If you want to thank me…
    https://tefltastic.wordpress.com/support/

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