Guess the body part from idioms pairwork

Student A

Choose one of the body parts below and then choose the most difficult idiom for your partner to guess. Read out the idiom with a gap and give your partner one chance to guess the missing body part. If they are wrong, you get one point and should give them the meaning. If their next guess is wrong, you get another point and should choose another idiom with the same missing body part and continue in the same way until they get it right. If they still haven’t guessed when you have run out of examples, give more hints until they do.

Eye

Up to my ___________s in work (= overwhelmed by how much work I have)

Keep your __________s on the prize (= remember the reason for doing something)

Your ______________s are bigger than your stomach (= You chose more food than you could eat)

Keep an ____________ on something (= watch carefully to make sure nothing happens)

Hand

A bird in the ______________ is worth two in the bush (= it’s better to have something sure rather than take a risk for a huge gain)

Lend someone a ____________ (= help)

The right __________ doesn’t know what the left one is doing (= two parts of a company don’t know what each other are doing)

Nose

Look down your __________ at someone (= think that you are superior to someone)

Turn up your __________ at something (= reject something)

Keep your __________ out of other people’s business (= don’t ask personal questions)

Powder your ____________ (= go to the toilet)

Shoulder

___________________ your responsibilities (= do what you should do)

a ____________________ to cry on (= a sympathetic listener)

An old head on young _________________s (= someone who is mature for their age)

Face

_______________ the music (= go into a difficult situation you are trying to avoid)

Keep a straight __________ (= not laugh)

A long ____________ (= looking miserable)

Egg all over your ____________ (= an embarrassing failure)

Two-_________d (= Someone who insults people behind their backs)

———————–

Guess the body part from idioms pairwork

Student B

Choose one of the body parts below and then choose the most difficult idiom for your partner to guess. Read out the idiom with a gap and give your partner one chance to guess the missing body part. If they are wrong, you get one point and should give them the meaning. If their next guess is wrong, you get another point and should choose another idiom with the same missing body part and continue in the same way until they get it right. If they still haven’t guessed when you have run out of examples, give more hints until they do.

Chest

Get it off my _________ (= say something that was burdening me/ feel relieved after talking about something)

Keep your cards close to your ____________ (= not give away too much information)

Back

I’ll ________________ you up (= support you)

Like water off a duck’s __________________ (= immune to criticism)

Behind his ________________ (= without him realising)

Foot/ feet

Two left _______________ (= clumsy/ bad at dancing)

Both __________________ on the ground (= realistic/ practical)

Put your ____________ in it (= say something insensitive)

Hand

I know this city like the back of my _______________ (= I know it really well, e.g. like a taxi driver)

Time on my _____________s (= time to kill/ too much free time)

Give someone a big ______________ (= clap/ applaud)

Be able to do something with your _________s behind your back (= do something, e.g. defeat someone, easily)

Head

______________ in the clouds (= unrealistic/ a dreamer)

Keep your __________ above water (= survive/ not go bankrupt)

Eyes in the back of your ____________ (= able to tell what is going on behind you, like a teacher)

Leg

Pull someone’s _________ (= tease them/ say something which isn’t true as a joke)

Break a ___________! (= Good luck!)

Cost an arm and a _____________ (= Cost a fortune/ Be expensive)

Give a __________ up to someone (= Help them progress/ Help them get a promotion)

———————————————–

PDF version for easy printing: Guess the body part from idioms pairwork

Advertisements

Leave a comment (link optional and email never shared)

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s