CPE Use of English collocations dominoes

Cambridge Proficiency Use of English Part One and Part Two 

Instructions for teachers

Choose which pack of dominoes you want to use, perhaps due to which part of the test you have just practised or want to practise next. If you want to do both, you could do a Use of English Part One paper, then the Use of English Part One dominoes, then the Use of English Part Two dominoes, and finally a Use of English Part Two paper.  

Copy, cut up and shuffle one pack per group of two to four students.

Each student takes seven cards each, then they lay one more card face up in the middle of the table. Students take turns trying to match half of one of their cards to one of the halves on the table to make collocations from (real) CPE exams. If they can’t make any match that their partners accept, they should pick one more card and play passes to the next person. Students continue in the same way until someone finishes all their dominoes or all the dominoes have been taken but no one can match any of their dominoes to the two ends of the string of dominoes on the table. The person with fewest dominoes left in their hand at the end wins the game.

When they finish the game, ask them to compare the matches between the dominoes on their table to the matches on an un-cut-up copy of the worksheet below, asking you if any different matches they made are possible. 

After the game, they could test each other on the collocations by:

  • Saying a sentence with one of the collocations but with one word missing for their partner to complete
  • Saying a sentence with one of the collocations but with one word missing and two or more options for words to put in the gap (from the worksheet or their own ideas) for their partner to repeat back with the right word in

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CPE Use of English Part One collocations dominoes to cut up/ Suggested answers

serious concerns

 

stimulating challenges still
applicable

 

innate talents intrinsic
value

 

see the light of day lay to
rest (the myth…)

 

a shining example of… a rebranding
exercise

 

a dusty old law firm a new lease of
life

 

the deadly perils (of…) reckless
actions draft

 

a report advertising
campaign a change of

 

fortune of central
importance put someone to sleep

 

render something
useless gather pace

 

hasten
his demise achievable goals become

 

the norm a common trait works

 

perfectly does his job competently confirm

 

that it is true support someone’s opinion sustain

 

life a plausible excuse a predictable

 

failure a prospective candidate the final

 

destination the exact location museum

 

pieces a mistaken notion sparks

 

a revolution have a serious flaw hit a

 

snag family heirloom personal

 

legacy capture the imagination command your

 

attention hold great appeal (for…) address

 

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Collocations in CPE Use of English Part Two dominoes

forward

 

nothing new under the sun for all
we know

 

in close formation on the other
hand

 

brings recognition to to what
degree

 

for good reason come to
fruition

 

a tall order might just make
it

 

would no longer be needed sounds
like science fiction

 

almost all each and
every time

 

it goes without saying needs little
more than…

 

strictly speaking can’t help
but wonder

 

think big given
enough support,…

 

very little research in danger
of disappearing

 

briefly if at all there is nothing
new in…

 

as far back as 1767 the phenomenon in
question

 

call to mind willing to put
up with discomfort

 

the first thing to pop into my head more often than
not

 

however odd it might seem change is on the
horizon

 

begin to make up a bigger part looking further

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PDF for easy saving and printing: Collocations in CPE Use of English dominoes

Related pages

Collocations page

Cambridge Proficiency classroom materials page