Ask and tell personalised questions coin game (TEFLtastic classics Part 28)

Updated 29 June 2020

I’ve been writing an article on games using coins in class (now up here), and it reminded me of this once all-time favourite game which I haven’t used in a while. Students take turns making questions using the grammar and/ or vocabulary that you have given them, e.g. “Would you… if…?” or love and relationships words. They can ask any question at all that they like, but after making the question they have to flip a coin to see if their partner will answer it (heads = ask) or if they have to answer it themselves (tails = tell), making it a kind of TEFL truth or dare.

Photocopiable ask and tell worksheets

Life events vocabulary speaking (ask and tell coin game and storytelling, with collocations and word formation practice) – NEW

Feelings opposites ask and tell coin game

Business vocabulary ask and tell personalised speaking coin game

Love and relationships vocabulary ask and tell speaking game

Australian slang ask and tell personalised speaking coin game

Health and fitness vocabulary ask and tell game

HR vocabulary ask and tell coin game

HR vocabulary ask and tell speaking game short version – (as published in English Teaching Professional magazine)

Present Simple ask and tell game

Slang Ask and Tell

Business ask and answer (my lesson plan and worksheet on Onestopenglish.com)

Market Leader Pre-Intermediate truth or dare game

Inside Out Upper Intermediate ask or tell game

Headway Pre-Intermediate ask or tell game

English File 1 Ask and answer game

I also used to have worksheets with question stems and key words for the future like “Would you like to…?” and “retire”, and it’s useable for virtually any topic, such as health, technology, relationships, crime and crime prevention, and abilities and skills (“terrible at”, etc).

For 40 other games that are so adaptable that you can make a whole teaching career out of them see here.

This entry was posted in Teaching English as a Foreign Language, TEFL games and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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